datasheets.com EBN.com EDN.com EETimes.com Embedded.com PlanetAnalog.com TechOnline.com  
Events
UBM Tech
UBM Tech

Open Source Doesn't Mean Open Door Anymore

Original Air Date: Aug 25, 2011 | Duration: 60 min Webinar
0 3
More Info Less Info

Secure and Hardened Linux Protects Your Embedded Devices: Introducing Wind River Linux Secure

Overview:
No matter what business you're in, security counts. If your product fails to measure up to expectations, your business takes a huge hit. And if your customer happens to be a soldier in the field or a patient on the operating table, the results can be even more devastating.

Every day brings news of yet another attack on the systems we trust. While top-down perimeter rings of security are often in place, how is a breach isolated and contained when they fail? Can you protect the integrity and confidentiality of data—or prevent partial or total system failure?

To harden the connected devices people rely on today, Wind River has expanded its portfolio of flexible and cost-effective security solutions by offering the first open source-based, EAL 4+ and FIPS 140-2-certified embedded Linux: Wind River Linux Secure.

Join Linux VP Paul Anderson, Linux Secure expert Milind Kukanur, and Wind River security guru Marc Brown as they talk about the cyber security trends and technologies capturing headlines today and how Wind River is shaping tomorrow's system designs.

What you'll learn:

  • The importance of combining top-down with bottom-up approaches to your security strategy
  • How our secure Linux solution incorporates and extends beyond SE Linux
  • Why the US Department of Defense urges its suppliers to use open source software
  • How and when to leverage Linux Secure in your industry

Who should attend

  • System architects
  • Security experts
  • Linux developers
  • Program managers with responsibility for software platform choice

Presenters:
Paul J. Anderson, Vice President, Product Strategy and Marketing, Wind River Linux
Combining a life-long appetite for Linux with technical and business leadership across the Wind River product portfolio, Paul Anderson is perfectly positioned to guide the commercial embedded open source revolution now in progress. In 2009, he moved from VP of Linux Engineering at Wind River to his present role, where he takes responsibility for product strategy, design and development, as well outbound marketing and business development for the Wind River Linux portfolio.

Milind Kukanur, Senior Product Manager, Wind River Linux
Milind Kukanur is Wind River's Senior Product Manager for the Wind River Linux product line. With over 12 years of software industry experience, his current product management responsibilities include Wind River Linux solutions for aerospace and defense, industrial, medical and transportation markets. He is also responsible for the areas of Linux security and certifications, graphics, multimedia and other middleware technologies. 

Marc Brown, Vice President of Tools and Marketing Operations, Products Group, Wind River
In his role, Marc is responsible for overall tools product strategy, business planning, and program execution; product group marketing operations, including product marketing, financial and business operations, and GTM. In addition, Marc is responsible for strategic corporate initiatives for security and development lifecycle, working closely with the Wind River CTO office, corporate marketing, and the products teams on strategy, product planning, and partner ecosystem.

3 comments
write a comment

No Avatar

alex128 Posted Aug 2, 2011

From the title, as if open source equals to open door ever before. Same logic, I guess in every open society, there is no military or police force, :)

reply

No Avatar

LegacyOfHerot Posted Aug 29, 2011

The principle of Open Sauce seems to be that you get thousands of volunteers to produce software that you then add to your product, and make money off their backs. Fair enough, if they are stupid enough to work for nothing, so be it. I'd like to propose the same thing in hardware; all electronic engineers should pay for their own PCB layout software, components, prototype gear, produce designs in their home office / study at their own expense, and give those designs away to IBM, Apple, HP, Panasonic etc. In fact why not do the same in the production line? We could build factories, get volunteers to come in and assemble kit, and not pay them. Fantastic for the bottom line. Oh wait, someone already though of that...

reply

No Avatar

eembedded_janitor Posted Oct 25, 2011

OK I've written considerable amounts of open source which has been used by many, many companies in many, many products shipping hundreds of millions of units. I don't consider I've been stupid to give away the code for nothing. First off, many people using the software see value in it and pay/sponsor further development and enhancement. Secondly, many companies have negotiated closed source access to the code and have paid regular licensing fees. Both of those provide some useful revenue. As open source matures, companies increasingly see the value in opening up access to their source or funding open source projects.

reply

Please Login

You will be redirected to the login page

×

Please Login

You will be redirected to the login page

×

Please Login

You will be redirected to the login page