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The Truth about Power Consumption in PIC MCUs with XLP Technology vs. TI's MSP430

Authored on: Aug 4, 2010 by Jason Tollefson

Technical Paper

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This white paper will clarify the facts behind Texas Instrument's arguments that presented TI's MSP430 as a better low power device than Microchip's XLP technology.
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mauro.laurenti Posted Oct 22, 2010

I do believe that competition can be done without fairness. Microchip white paper shows that some features were not considered within the comparison, or better were discarded. Nevertheless Microchip white paper has been strongly influenced by Marketing as well. Talking about truth it´s marketing. The truth belongs to the designer and his design requirements. Beside this little dispute I believe that both TI and Microchip are doing a very good job in saving power.

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mauro.laurenti Posted Oct 22, 2010

I correct the first sentence, I changed an adjective so the word "without" should have been changed to "with": I do believe that competition can be done with fairness.

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Amr Hendy Posted Oct 24, 2010

Seems to be a lawyer who is writing this article

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antennahead Posted Oct 26, 2010

As a TI Field Apps Engineer I get to acknowledge daily that MicroChip makes some good parts, and they have a loyal following. They must be doing something right at least some of the time. While it is interesting to extract data from TI's data sheets for this paper, it would have been much more compelling if Microchip had done he same with their own parts, and truly put specific, comparable parts side by side. I think we can all agree that the industry has done a good job advancing low power MCU technology to the point where their is truly a lot of competition, and you can probably thank TI for driving a good share of that with the MSP430 for the last 17 years. These days does it really matter if the DCO wakes up in 1 us or 10 us? Does it really matter in the majority of applications if your RAM retention "sleep" current is 500 nA or 2000 nA? It's usually the case that the active modes and external circuitry will burn the bulk of the energy anyway. There's a lot more to power management than these silly specs- you need thrifty peripherals, software, support and your own skills to do well, and you need to decide which company you believe will do a better job helping you get your ultra-low-power project done.

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jeanjo Posted Dec 13, 2010

As always depends on the Application

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ams0178 Posted Apr 15, 2011

It would have been nice to see an independent engineer not affiliated with TI or Microchip write the comparison...

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gayatrikumar_1 Posted Apr 26, 2012

Anyway this article has shown some Key points to watchout while comparing specs. Great job !

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