datasheets.com EBN.com EDN.com EETimes.com Embedded.com PlanetAnalog.com TechOnline.com  
Events
UBM Tech
UBM Tech
Welcome Guest Log In | Register | Benefits

Preparing for Google TV

Authored on: Jul 20, 2010

Technical Paper

0 8
More InfoLess Info
Google and partners recently announced Google TV—an open, architecture-neutral platform that will bring the full web experience to television viewing. It is likely there will be a large number of future Google TV systems based on the MIPS architecture. Leveraging their work with Android and ongoing relationship with Google, MIPS is in an excellent position to work with our licensees as Google TV moves beyond initial reference platforms and into mainstream development within the digital home market. By designing your SoC to the right specifications now, you can be ahead of the market when the Google TV code is available in open source in 2011. In this paper, MIPS will provide an in-depth description of hardware requirements and recommendations for developing a SoC that will support the Google TV operating system.
8 comments
write a comment

http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/poconoarmchairreview Posted Jul 26, 2010

I have to stop drinking beer when I read these. I was all ready to be Prepared for Google TV when I started the article. Then I got to the point where it said, the secret to providing a web browsing experience on a TV, that is similar to the experience you'd have on a PC or MAC, is (get ready), hardware and software! It got better. (I love this part.) It said, previous digital video products needed CPUs that ran only "light-duty" tasks and a "small operating system." You know, punk stuff. But with Google TV, the CPU needs to be super-hyper-duper. Which is great for engineers! Google TV could take over where Microsoft left off, in their march to push the hardware performance envelope higher and higher (and so keep equipment turnover high, and sales aimed upward). Sounds like work and jobs to me! (I have to point out one more item: Google TV will require several standard applications--but they're yet to be announced! That's pretty standard!) Anyway, the bottom line is that Google TV should stimulate new product development. Just don't expect to be able to build a prototype for your pointy hair boss after reading this White Paper. But, then it did say these were only the preliminary requirements for Google TV. Tune in next week! I know I will!

reply

No Avatar

Warren.Edwards Posted Jul 28, 2010

Agree with previous Comment. I've already read several documents listed in this paper's References section. This paper adds no new information nor insight to previous information on Google TV.

reply

ahshabazz Posted Aug 3, 2010

I likes me tickles me funny.

reply

ChakC Posted Aug 4, 2010

If you do not know much about Google TV, this document is pretty good and informative, briefing you the uP, kernel, browser, CODEC, and so on.

reply

Frank Eory Posted Aug 4, 2010

The system architecture shown looks a lot like a cable or satellite Set-Top Box embedded in what they are calling a "Smart TV." So far, consumers have not really embraced TVs with a lot of extra built-in functionality like embedded DVR, internet connectivity and so on. Even CableCard support is going away, as Panasonic recently announced they are discontinuing their CableCard-ready TVs. If there really is going to be an "explosion of Google TV devices," as this paper predicts, then most likely those devices will resemble set-top boxes and not high-dollar add-ons to the internal electronics of TV sets. After all, for the 90% of us who get TV by either cable or satellite, some sort of set-top box is needed anyway just for access to the content -- specifically the decryption/authentication -- so putting all those other set-top box features inside the TV would just be redundant. All this makes me wonder that if consumers really want the Android OS, user interface and applications that comprise Google TV, it seems like the usual Set-Top Box manufacturers for cable & satellite could just load that software stack onto their own boxes. None of this requires new hardware design...except perhaps by those usual Set-Top Box manufacturers, who are always being pushed for faster CPUs, more memory and more CODEC support.

reply

brahmagitam Posted Aug 16, 2010

Its good

reply

No Avatar

MIrandaSB Posted Jan 26, 2011

I have the Logitech Revue, and I will say that It really isn't as expensive as you all think. I purchased mine from my employer about 2 months ago (I work for DISH) and I got it for a nice price of $179! The apps and functionality of the system all together, is perfect. Google is currently working on more apps, but thus far my favorites are Netflix, and Amazon. If it runs this good now, I can't wait till it becomes improved!

reply

No Avatar

samraine100 Posted Mar 22, 2012

What I like about the Google Tv is that we can download firmware updates right from the couch, and install them without having to buy new TVs. This makes the lifespan of the products much longer, and they can remain relevant. I am excited that I can do web surfing and watch TV at the same time. This would be perfect for us couch potatoes. Sam - http://www.cctvdirect.co.uk

reply

Please Login

You will be redirected to the login page

×

Please Login

You will be redirected to the login page

×

Please Login

You will be redirected to the login page