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Fundamentals of DSPs: Part 2 - A Filter Application

Posted on: Jul 29, 2010 | Duration: 60 min.
Course | 3278 views
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To go beyond theory and actually work with DSP you need to focus on the practical issues that are both critical and most interesting to working engineers. This course helps you take that next step with a concrete, quantitative and practical approach to DSP that focuses on engineering questions. It will help you to make quantitative, practical design decisions based on DSP system requirements, to understand the purpose and scope of application of Digital Signal Processors, to identify their special features and match them against typical applications, and to understand and be able to apply the basic techniques in programming them efficiently.

In it we outline a simple but interesting practical filter application that is also typical of a wide range of application domains (for example military and navigational sonar, medical ultrasound, industrial echo-based testing, noise monitoring, and a wide variety of filter-based applications). So it will capture your interest and is easy to follow while at the same time being obviously relevant to real requirements. Filter implementation is one of the most common DSP applications, and one that raises most design questions from engineers who are not experienced with DSP.

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investigator Posted Aug 24, 2010

Audio only, no video

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jin_par Posted Aug 26, 2010

Video not available

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ZulaZabor Posted Sep 4, 2010

Audio and Video Perfect, Content excellent, tempo a little slow Exercises perfect Over all 5 out of 5

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ZulaZabor Posted Sep 4, 2010

I was searching for “part 1”. Can you give me a hint?

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patrick.mannion Posted Sep 7, 2010

Hi there, glad you enjoyed the course! Part 1 of Fundamentals of DSP can be found here: http://www.eetimes.com/electrical-engineers/education-training/courses/4000139/Fundamentals-of-DSP Enjoy!

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foresightyj Posted Nov 13, 2010

Great tutorial but I have a question regarding the slide 'Big fish?'. Why did you say that the highest frequency in the signal is 1.5 times the center frequency which is 15kHz? Thanks in advance.

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Chris Bore Posted Nov 13, 2010

Hi :-) In the commentary I said the pulse has a bandwidth equal to its centre frequency. If we call the center frequncy fc, then that means the bandwidth (bw) is also fc. And the bw is centred on fc, so extends from (fc - fc/2) up to (fc + fc/2). Thus the highest frequency is (fc + fc/2) = 1.5* fc which is one and a half times the center frequency. This is just an estimate and depends what we mean by 'bandwidth' (no content outside the band? less than a certain amount? etc). But this kind of rough estimate gives you a quick way to check numerically and so, as in the example, to decide on reasonable first-guess specifications. Chris

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msakms Posted Apr 8, 2011

such a wonderful course, many many thanks for the great effort

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Def Posted Apr 29, 2011

Thank you for this very good course. Just a few minor issues that I spotted, for the sake of accuracy: Slide 19 (Big fish): 1800 samples, not 3600. Also, spoken commentary mistakenly mentions frequency = wavelength/speed, which should be frequency = speed/wavelength, as written correctly in the slide. Slides 24, 25 (Exercise 1): 80 micro s, not nano s. Slides 28, 29 (Exercise 2): tables should be swapped. The table with no answers should be in the question page, and the table with the answers should be in the answers page. Slide 35 (Filter arithmetic): 16 + 6 = 22, not 24. Slides 39, 40 (Exercise 3): The tables should read "12 bit" for "Signal bit depth", as given in the exercise. Slide 41 (Processing speed): 64 * 200,000 = 12.8 million MACs/s, not 13.6 million. The writing is wrong but the spoken commentary is correct.

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Ying Liu Posted Feb 14, 2012

This is a really useful and easy to understand video! Although some mistakes, still a great tutorial!

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rameshb_14 Posted Nov 15, 2012

Hi, Could you please help me to find part 1. Thanks in Advance. Ramesh

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